It would be so easy to think of estate planning as a responsibility for someone older or wealthier or some other category outside of yours. The truth is, though, planning for the future is important for everyone, regardless of age or economic status. Pennsylvania families who want to take care of each other well will want to take the time to designate who gets what when the time comes. 

The Pennsylvania Bar Association offers some basic insight into the process by answering questions you and your family may have. Perhaps the most advantageous aspect of drawing up a Will is the power of choice. You choose.

You decide who will administer your estate. You set up who will get the house, the car, the land and any other tangible assets. You say who will be the beneficiaries of life insurance and other policies that involve the distribution of funds. 

Without a Will, the law chooses for you. A set formula determines how to divide your assets, so family members you may not want to benefit could share in the distribution. One of the most concerning aspects of giving your choice to the state is if you have minor children. When a parent has not designated a caretaker in a Will, children may have a court-appointed guardian assigned to take care of them. No parent wants that.

If you wisely begin planning your estate early in life, you may wonder what happens to your Will as you grow older, your assets increase and your children become adults. The Pennsylvania Bar Association assures you there is no need to worry. You can update your Will as often as needed.

Note this is educational information only and does not intend to serve as legal advice.